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Overwhelming evidence shows pesticides are destroying bees

October 26, 2012
Jonathan Benson
10/25/2012

As reported recently by the U.K.’s Guardian, a new study published in the journal Nature is the latest in a long line of recent studies to show that common crop chemicals are destroying bee populations worldwide, which will also eventually destroy much of the world’s food supply if left unaddressed. And even though at least two-thirds of the world’s bumblebee population is now likely dying off as a result of combined pesticide exposures, regulatory bodies in the U.K., the U.S., and elsewhere continue to deny that these harmful chemicals need to be banned.

A much greater threat than so-called global “climate change,” the decline in bee populations due to pesticide and herbicide exposure is one of the most serious environmental threats in the world today. Without bees, food crops that rely on these important insects for pollination will wither and die, causing widespread food shortages. For this reason, ecology experts are urging government authorities to rediscover their consciences by standing up against this chemical-induced insect genocide, which has the very real potential to eventually unleash human genocide.

One of the ways in which they are accomplishing this is by drawing attention to studies like the recent Nature study, which clearly illustrates the fact that bees are severely threatened by combined exposures to multiple pesticide chemicals. Since bees encounter potentially hundreds of pesticide chemicals in real-world conditions, studying such exposures in a laboratory setting was the goal of the new research.

“Work in my lab is building on previous work looking at neonicotinoids, the systemic pesticides that are used extensively in agriculture at the moment,” said Nigel Raine of Royal Holloway, University of London, author of the study, in a recent video report. “What we’re doing is we’re looking at the effects of multiple pesticides, not just the neonicotinoids but also pyrethroids, which is the sort of situation that beesare faced with in the field. They visit multiple crop species which may have different pesticides applied to them.”

And now… the rest of the story. …..
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